Monday, 13 May 2019

Zatannna



Here's a fun, and little bit mad, Zatanna three-parter from Adventure Comics, that then was reprinted in the above issue of DC Super-Stars. It's from Len Wein & Gray Morrow, so you know you're in good hands.
I always found Zatanna's habit of speaking spells backwards something that slowed down the story, and though she was never quite as compelling a character as her Devil's Daughter namesake over at Marvel, being Millie The Model to Satana's Chili, she comes across well here, particularly the way Gray draws her, and that panel where she complains of her tongue wilting is absolutely priceless.
Mind, the villain is unbelievably irritating, with his verbal tic of...eh..eh...saying eh...every eh...three seconds. There was a a race of aliens later on in The Legion that did the same thing, and it used to drive me crazy. Gniyonna dab syug raeppasid!  






















11 comments:

  1. Od erom stsop ekil siht Etep.
    Always up for a bit of that hokey early 70s DC vibe, and Gray Morrow did a good job here.
    He's the kind of artist - too "old skool" to really appeal to kids in the 70s, but not in that Al Williamson league that made reprints viable and encouraged putting in the effort to track down old stuff later - thats well served by a blog like this.

    But I'm sure you know that - a quick look at the tags on the right and it seems that Morrow is one of the three artists you've posted most work by. With Gene Colan and Jack Kirby no less!
    Well done, and keep it up.

    -sean

    ReplyDelete
  2. I didn't know that! Buscema must be no. 3 surely...
    Gray was so great though, wasn't he?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Ah, you're right - you have posted more Buscema, who beats even Kirby (by one). Duh. Well, I did say it was a quick look...

    Twelve posts tagged is still quite a surprisingly large amount of Morrow though. I'd say he was pretty good rather than great... Very underrated, so its nice to see him remembered and well represented here.
    (Now I think about it, you should have included that Falcon back up he did in an issue of Captain America in that last post. Morrow drew the coolest Leila...)

    -sean

    ReplyDelete
  4. Yeah, I'll put that one on the list to post too for def.

    ReplyDelete
  5. This is the most actual drawing (and least amount of photo tracing) I've seen from Gray Morrow in a '70s story. He can draw well, even if he doesn't "push the pose" when extreme action calls for it. Reed Crandall and sometimes even Al Williamson fell into not giving enough *oomph* to physical altercations. Woody, too. I'm amazed at how much pelvis under the fishnet DC allowed Zatanna to display under the Comics Code.

    Regards,
    Chris A.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Gray Morrow was a fantastic artist - like Toth, Wrightson, Alcala and other early-70s DC mainstays, the man was too good for superheroes.

    Not that he didn't have his flaws, of course. "Jeff's" choice of apparel is cringingly hideous: polka-dot bellbottoms, puffy pirate shirt, and an ascot that all but pleads "punch me!" Yet never was a godawful ensemble so beautifully illustrated!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Those were the groovy threads of the late '60s/early '70s. Austin Powers would certainly approve!

      Dig It!

      Gene Poole

      Delete
    2. Check out some more far-out fashions of the early '70s in "Image of Darkness," drawn by Gray Morrow for House of Mystery #192 in 1971:

      http://creatfeatforever.blogspot.com/2018/06/image-of-darkness.html?m=1

      - Neil

      Delete
    3. I was very fond of that mirror story in childhood. Short, but poignant, and interesting in that Cain is a character in this one, and not just the horror host. A classic.

      Regards,
      Chris A.

      Delete
    4. Nice story, "Image of Darkness."

      You should upload that one here, Pete, before it suddenly disappears from that other site.

      Gene Poole

      Delete
  7. Jeff's a bit of an arse though, to be fair.

    ReplyDelete