Sunday, 26 May 2019

The Incredible Hulk: Between Hammer & Anvil!



Herb Trimpe was born today, so allow me to apologise for hating his work as a kid, by posting one of my fave Hulk's.
I could've gone for the obvious 1st appearance of Wolverine, but let's do the next issue instead, where Ol' Greenskin finds himself a friend, travellin' man Crackajack Jackson ( who seems to have wandered in from a Ray Bradbury story ).
You also have a couple of great villains in Hammer & Anvil, and even if how they got their powers has to be the most shoe-horned in thing Len Wein ever wrote, well, somebody was gonna come up with these two at some point in the history of comics.


















19 comments:

  1. What a comedown after Len's great Swamp Thing scripts!

    Some vestiges of #10 appear in this one, however: "Hunk" Dorry, a chain gang escapee, and Black Jubal are now Hammer and Anvil; Auntie de Luvian is now Crackerjack, and the Swamp Thing is now the Hulk. Even Arcane's tombstone in the finale is now Crackerjack's. Hmmmmm.....

    Regards,
    Chris A.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think we can forgive Len the occasional self-plagarism. Joe Simon said: 'If an idea's funny or exciting or whatever it is, it's ok to use it six or seven times...'

      Delete
    2. And he did!

      Delete
    3. Gerry Conway self-plagiarised his Spider-man clone concept when he wrote some of the Redondo era Swamp Thing issues & had Swampy fighting a clone of sorts.

      Regards,
      Chris A.

      Delete
  2. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Diff'rent strokes and all that, Alec. I'm the first to admit, it took me decades to get into him.

      Delete
  3. Sorry to say that to this very day, I have never much cared for Trimpe's art style. I don't hate his work, by any means - he is certainly a more-than-competent draftsman - so I guess it's just a matter of personal preference.

    Well, maybe that's tainted a bit, too, by his long association with the Hulk. Bronze Age Hulk was, for the most part, a train wreck of a series, unable to keep a steady writer interested enough to stay more than a year or so, seemingly passed around the Bullpen like a hot gamma potato.

    Roy's run (right after Stan's) was the best. At least Roy seemed to give a damn - and I'll defy anybody not to read his last story (#147 - 'Heaven is a Very Small Place') without getting a little choked-up.

    But after that, it was Conway, then Englehart, then Wein, etc, etc - all illustrated by Trimpe - and it was deadly dull. The writers clearly weren't thrilled about being there & neither was I.

    ReplyDelete
  4. La masa (that's the spanish name of Hulk during 70s and 80s) was one of the few supes comic books I ever readed in my childhood. But just because it was for me something closer to horror than to pojama people. Foes like Wendigo or The abomination, or his magazine with those fantastic Moon Knight backup stories were great!

    Manuel Ruiz

    ReplyDelete
  5. Trimpe inking himself didn't always meet with optimal results. For that, you'd have to look to someone like John Severin, or Klaus Janson; Severin, in particular, added a look of realism to the man-monster (and the book itself) that meshed perfectly with Trimpe's style, IMO.

    ReplyDelete
  6. In complete agreement with Comicsfan about the Trimpe-Severin team: Severin was the perfect inker for Trimpe, just like Palmer was the perfect inker for Colan. It's a shame they never worked more together.

    ReplyDelete
  7. When I was growing up I noticed a lot of fat kids really related to the Hulk and his pathos. Not sure why, just sayin'.

    Gene Poole

    ReplyDelete
  8. Before I'd even read any of the other comments, I was going to say that I liked Trimpe's art when it was inked by Severin, but not so much when it was inked by either himself or others. I see that others agree, so I'm not alone in that opinion it seems. Stan thought he was a great visual storyteller though, and he was usually right about such things so who am I to argue?

    ReplyDelete
  9. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I will always have a soft spot for Trimpes Hulk as it was probably Hulk issues 136 and 137 that got me into the Hulk. While I have always enjoyed Trimpes Hulk it was the Trimpe/Severin (Thomas) art team that pushed the Hulk into being the great character he became.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Trimpe / Severin next time then...!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Better yet Pete, how about just Severin for the next post...?

    -sean

    ReplyDelete
  13. Yeah, those two Trime-Severin issues with Ka-Zar were a blast, and I thought Dan Adkins, who followed Severin for a bit, was also a good match. But yeah, Trimpe on Trimpe wasn't so good, nor was Staton on Trimpe.

    I like some of the Englehart Hulks, but "Hammer and Anvil" is the only Wein Hulk that didn't seem totally phoned-in. FWIW, the overall blandness of the seventies Hulk made the Peter David run stand out by comparison.

    ReplyDelete