Thursday, 1 November 2018

Lost In Time



We've had a request, and to use an old gag, it's not "Will you stop banging on about Bronze Age comics for god's sake."
Nope, Nefarious Neil Hansen, old pal of this blog and fellow FOOBA would like to see more Paul Gillon.
Gillon was a French artist who is probably best known in the English speaking comics world for The Survivor, a post apocalypse erotic thriller that made the most of his marvellously clinical art style.
Neil thought Gillon did some stuff for Vampirella Eerie. Well, not sure about Vampi, but he certainly had some stuff in Eerie, or I should say had some stuff reprinted.
Spaceforce: Spacewrecked is an English translation of Lost In Time, a series that Gillon did with Barbarella's Jean-Claude Forrest, and although the translation seems a bit lacking, rushing through the story, you can't argue with the art.
As I say, there's a real oddness & distance to Gillon's work that I can't resist, like Stan Drake suddenly being overwhelmed with a fatal bout of ennui.
Unfortunately, Eerie only published four short instalments of this epic space opera, but NBM did an English translation of at least the first chapter. Here's the first part of Warren's version.














21 comments:

  1. Was Victor de la Fuente's Haxtur ever translated into English in its entirety? Warren may have run a few instalments of it. Highly influential on the continent in its day.

    Regards,
    Chris A.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you for showing the Gillon stuff. It looks absolutely fabulous! Up there with Stan Drake, Al Williamson and John Burns.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I think previously Gillon did a strip in France that looked spot on like Stan Drake though I do not recall its name.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Chris, if you scroll down to the right there, I did a piece on Haxtur a while back - it ran briefly in 1984 and Eerie. There's also some info about it in the comments from our old pal Diego Cordoba ( this blog's go-to-guy for info about Spanish strips & artists! )

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Will do. Cheers!

      Chris A.

      Delete
  5. And Neil, check your emails, I've sent you something...

    ReplyDelete
  6. Glenat put out ten volumes of this recently, in colour, Only the first four were written by Forrest though, the rest written by Gillon.

    ReplyDelete
  7. There ya go! If anybody's gonna know...

    ReplyDelete
  8. NBM published a second volume in English, Cannibal World.

    Btw, that was a good way of putting it - "like Stan Drake suddenly being overwhelmed with a fatal bout of ennui" describes Gillon's work nicely.

    -sean

    ReplyDelete
  9. Funny you mentioned Stan Drake, as his 'The Heart of Juliet Jones' strip was so incredibly popular in France, that they asked Gillon to create a similar strip. It was called '13, rue de l'Espoir' (13, street of Hope), and done in a style very reminiscent to Drake's.

    Gillon worked in incredible large art boards (nearly 3 feet tall), inspired by those Hal Foster had used in Prince Valiant, which is why everything looks so detailed.

    In Vampirella they reprinted some of his 'Jeremy of the Isles' series (which like PV didn't have any word balloons—but at Warren they obviously added them), although it was left inconclusive, like many other of Warren's later serials.

    Gillon was perhaps one of the best artists in France. He drew in a style closer to the great American newspaper strip artists than the French.

    I won't even take a look at the text here, since at Warren they re-wrote everything and it probably makes no sense to the original work.

    ReplyDelete
  10. That's absolutely the case, thanks Diego.

    ReplyDelete
  11. My first thought on seeing this was that it looks very like of Syd Jordan's Lance McLane, which is no bad thing, imo. I'll read it when I get home.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sydney Jordan was my first thought as well. Hadn't heard of this artist before. Thanks Pete.

      Delete
  12. The "fatal bout of ennui" is nothing less than an over reliance upon photo reference which has stiffened up the work of many a comics artist over the years (Gray Morrow, Al Williamson, & Tony de Zuniga, to name a few). Frazetta was an exception, because he knew how to PUSH THE POSE when needed, as did Neal Adams. John Buscema beautifully demonstrates this in HOW TO DRAW THE MARVEL WAY. There are times for very subtle, natural body gestures in figure drawing, & there are times to pull out all the stops. The photo tracers fall into trouble with the latter.

    Regards,
    Chris A.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, photo reference and photo tracing are two different things.
      (Although fwiw I do agree either way that Gillon's work is a little stiff)

      -sean

      Delete
  13. I don't think I've heard of this artist before, but my first thought was that, though it was very well rendered, it looked a little stiff maybe because of too much photo reference. Seems I was right, going by the above comments. Still lovely stuff though.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Indeed, I still say tho that the oddness isn't solely down to the photo reference. Alex Roth was a fan and talked about that very thing in the intro to the first book.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Alex Roth?? I hate that guy! I mean, of course, Alex Toth. Alex Roth indeed. Worst artist of the bronze age by far.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I thought you were saying Alex Ross with a lisp.

      Delete