Thursday, 20 July 2017

Haxtur



Haxtur was a great little series that ran in a couple of issues of 1984, then inexplicably transferred over to Eerie for the rest of it's run.
It's about ( as you'll see ) a South American mercenary who finds himself in a strange new world, where everyone seems out to kill him. It belongs to a genre probably best described as existential sword & sorcery, something there's nowhere near enough of for my taste.
As Haxtur wanders through this dangerous new land, getting involved in various quests with various different characters and not always seeing them through, we're as puzzled and eternally questioning as he is.
The strip feels also lightly satirical, particularly regarding the various false gods and religions Haxtur comes up against, as well as the way he constantly asks the questions no one ever asks in these situations, but that you or I would, such as: What gives you the right to chain me to this wall? or Why ARE you trying to kill me? Though this may be down to my own warped sense of humour.
The final revelation as to where he actually is, and what he's actually meant to be doing, probably doesn't come as that much of a surprise, but as Haxtur himself finds out, the destination isn't always as important as the journey.












9 comments:

  1. This is very cool. I wasn't familiar with this series. Thanks for sharing.

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  2. I have some of the 1984/Eerie issues, but was Haxtur ever collected into a single English volume?

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  3. I don't think so, no, there's nothing on the GCBD anyway.
    Neil, De La Fuente also did a very similar series called Haggarth that's also worth looking out for. It ran in Eerie as well and I'll obviously put some of that up at some point too.

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  4. Haxtur was heavily censored in Spain, because of its apparent hero looking like comunist Che Guevara, so Victor de la Fuente truned it into a sword and sorcery fantasy, but still met with censorship—and decided to quit working in Spain and moved to France, where there was more liberty regarding comic books. He created Haggarth there—but never completed the third chapter.

    After his death, a third chapter was completed from notes and drawings he left behind and a book collecting the whole series was published in France.

    Victor worked heavily in British comics, doing lots of war strips and series, but hardly for Warren, as he didn't care for horror stories. Unfortunately both Haxtur and Haggarth were censored and panels changed by the great guys at Warren (as was the case with material published in 1984/1994 and their other magazines).

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  5. Thanks Diego, no surprise the strip was messed around by Warren. Be interested to look into what he did for British comics - always thought the style looked familiar - will have to go back through my collection.

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  6. Hi Peter. Victor worked on Trelawny of the Guards, Blackbow the Cheyenne, Yellowknife of the Yard (along with many other Spanish artists), and countless war comics for DC Thomson's Commando. I'm peparing a special issue on the British War comics and their artists for Illustrators Quarterly.

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  7. The only one of those I'm familiar with is Yellowknife Of The Yard, and would never have placed that as the same artist!

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  8. I think he only did one episode of Yellowknife. For Trelawny (which appeared in Lion) he did many episodes. He also did quite a few war stories in Commando and those pocket-book sized War comics. Most bizarre are the romantic stories he did for those teen-girl magazines. You'll hardly recognize his artwork.

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  9. Ah ok - not an area I read really, sad to say.

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